Thursday, 10 August 2017

Border Crossing

The forecast was indifferent.  Definitely NOT beach weather!  We cogitated. We deliberated.  A plan of action was required, but where shall we go? Finally it was decreed that we would cross the border into Cornwall and visit some of the south eastern corner of that county - the bit most people bypass on their way to more exotic locations, such as Newquay, Padstow or St Ives.
"Would you rather go by ferry or use the bridge?" we asked the KHT.
"The Bridge" declared that romantic little soul.  There was a pause, and then she said quietly, "But is IS a long time since I have been on a ferry. Let's go by ferry and return by the bridge."  Thinking that returning is always a good plan, we readily agreed to this scheme.  However, the Sat nav seemed a bit uncertain about our proposal.
"Have you allowed 'tolls' and 'ferrys'?" I enquired. We didn't want the poor thing having a nervous breakdown each time we crossed the river. Buttons were pressed,and seemed to indicate that 'the woman' would allow our journery, but the sat nav was still not certain. It hasn't entirely forgiven me for yesterdays mishap, when I accidentally ejecting the sd card containing the memory banks of the the sat nav, whilst trying to recharge my phone.  So it came to pass that we had to resort to the old fashioned method of map reading, and following road signs whils negotiating Plymouth.  Great joy!

We knew we didn't want the continental ferry (our plans were not that ambitious), but signs to the ferry to Cornwall were few and far between.  It was not until I looked at the map more closely that I remembered that Torpoint was in Cornwall, so all we had to do was follow Torpoint signs.... There was a fair old queue for the ferry, but we were soon loaded on, and crossing the Tamar. Once this was accomplished the satnav forgave us and started behaving again...

We headed to Mount Edgcumbe, as it sounded rather interesting, but when we arrived it didn't feel like what we were looking for - though what exactly that was none of us were certain!  We consulted the map once more, and decided to head up to Rame Head. The route took us up some very, very, very narrow lanes.  However when we arrived at the car park we knew we had made the right decision as it was absolutely stunningly beautiful.




After lunch we joined other tourists on the pilgrimage to the ancient 13th century chapel and admired the views. Afterwards we stopped off at the coastgard observation station to chat with the volunteers, who keep watch and log boats entering Plymouth Sound. While we were there some of the leading boats from this years Fastnet Race passed by.  The lighthouse on Eddystone rock was clearly visible today.
"How far away do you think that is?" they asked the KHT.
"About 10 miles" she guessed.
They were impressed. Most people guess 2 miles, instead of the 8 and a half miles, which it is. I must admit it looked a lot nearer than that.

We paused to admire the simple stone church at Rame, which appears to be lit only by candles.
By now the sun had broken through, so we stopped by at Kingsand to enjoy a sneaky sit on the beach in the sunshine, whilst the KHT collected more sea glass.





We headed back over the Tamar Bridge, admiring the beautiful sceenery. Later when I looked a my photographs, I noted that the Tamar Bridge was built as recently as 1961! That must have been a vintage year!